Sayajirao Gaekwad III (Part 5)

Karishma Mishra
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Heritage and views 

Though a prince of a native state, he guarded his rights and status even at the cost of annoyance to the British Indian Government. Sayajirao was often in conflict with the British on matters of principle and governance, having continuous and longstanding verbal and written disputes with the British Residents as well as with the Viceroy and officials in the Government of India. He was granted the title of Farzand-i-Khas-i-Daulat-i-Inglishia on 29 December 1876. He attended the Delhi Durbars of 1877, 1903 and 1911; it was at the 1911 Delhi Durbar that an incident occurred that proved to have far-reaching ramifications for Sayajirao's relations with the Raj.

Laxmi Vilas Palace, Vadodara, built in 1890 by Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad 3

 

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A demonstration of independence 

Sayajirao with Sir Richard Temple, the Governor of Bombay and other members of the court. c. 1880

At the grand and historic 1911 Delhi Durbar, attended by George V— the first time that a reigning British monarch had travelled to India, each Indian ruler or "native prince" was expected to perform proper obeisance to the King-Emperor by bowing three times before him, then backing away without turning their back on the British Monarch.

Karishma Mishra
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