Battle Of Buxar (Part 3)

Karishma Mishra
10 minutes
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Immediately After 

The British victory at Buxar had "at one fell swoop", disposed of the three main scions of Mughal power in Upper India. Mir Kasim [Qasim] disappeared into an impoverished obscurity. Shah Alam realigned himself with the British, and Shah Shuja [Shuja-ud-Daula] fled west hotly pursued by the victors. The whole Ganges valley lay at the Company's mercy; Shah Shuja eventually surrendered; henceforth Company troops became the power-brokers throughout Oudh as well as Bihar.

Long Term Aftermath 

This battle altered the future path for India. The British had been interested in coastal areas including Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta. This battle along with the battles of Palasi and the Anglo-French wars in Carnatic began a British conquest of India. By 1765 the British were essentially ruling Bihar and Bengal. The Nawab of Awadh started to become dependent on them and soon became the Nawab of Carnatic.

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There is still some historical tension between Britain and India. Much of this tension was created in the events leading up to the war which included misuse of Farman and Dastak by the British which challenged the authority of Mir Qasim, pressure and force applied to Indian vendors, peasants, merchants, and artisans to sell their products at ridiculously low prices, begin a trend of bribery, an abolition of all duties on internal trade from the British, and also British abuse to trade ethics and challenged Nawab authority.

Karishma Mishra
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